Week 12 Main Post: Nostalgic

I’ve procrastinated as long as I can from writing these final blog posts for this class. For good reason.

I hate to see it come to an end. It feels like I started this blog yesterday.

Seriously three years of dabbling in blogging has felt like three days. When you’re doing what you love, time tends to pass quickly.

And even though I haven’t decided whether I’ll continue posting on this blog specifically, I know I won’t ever stop blogging. Especially since it took me almost three years to make a cent from it. If I could blog for one thousand days for free, surely I can blog for a thousand more when there’s potential to earn money. It isn’t a lot. But it’s enough for now.

This course and the subsequent creation of this blog has taught me:

To time manage.

I think if people really want to write or a book or start a blog, they should stop wishing and start working. We all have 24 hours in a day. If others can do it, so can you. In order to set aside enough time for this blog, I tried to spend my hours effectively. Otherwise, I wouldn’t have posted anything.

To do my research.

I very much have a love-hate relationship with research. Usually hate wins. But when it doesn’t, I could spend forever reading and researching. Because I didn’t know much about some of these social justice issues, I made an effort to educate myself. Besides, there are many experts out there who are much more eloquent than I am, so why not take a page out of their proverbial book?

To appreciate but critique the city.

Just because you love something doesn’t mean you should be blinded by the good and don’t see the bad. I feel like in being able to notice the flaws, my fondness for Toronto has skyrocketed

In five years, I hope I’ll still remember I was able to publish 11 posts a week. Okay so maybe they weren’t perfect or as polished as a diamond. But I still managed the feat nonetheless. So when I’m complaining about doing 7 or 8, I’ll quickly shut up and solider on.

Advertisements

Week 10 Secondary Post: Social Justice Journalism

I’ve stumbled across many social justice blogs and organizations during this year that I wouldn’t have otherwise, if not for this course, Blogging the Just City.

But I still wonder…

Is the future of social justice journalism still bright?

I think a lot of people have different stances on this topic. Plenty of others before me have offered their opinions on issues related to social justice and journalism. Now I want to contribute mine.

Social justice is fundamental to society, any society. There won’t always be complete justice for everybody, but without any measure of justice, there isn’t much of a society. At least in my eyes.

Journalism, on the other hand, isn’t dead. It has just taken on modernized, digitalized forms. And there’s nothing wrong with enhancing the way readers access their news. If anything, journalism has grown more alive. Time has revived the older print form of journalism and breathed new life into it on the Internet. Today writers can share news faster and easier than ever before. 

No matter what happens in the upcoming months and years, there is a future for social justice journalism. Just like there is a future for both separately. Social justice will continue to exist. Advocates will advocate for equality, fairness, and justice. Writers as well as bloggers will keep journalism alive. Social justice journalism has the potential to revolutionize society. 

More and more people are engaging in social justice journalism. Blogs, run by an individual or by an organization, are being created every day. Many of them report on social justice issues or touch on them to some extent. 

Blogging isn’t equivalent to journalism, but it’s still a way of contributing to social justice discussions. And those conversations often lead to so much more. 

Week 1 Main Post: Divided

Pride and optimism can overcome, to a major extent, a sense of division…

Anne Golden, The Star

Growing up I never would have described Toronto as “The Divided City“. It took years before I noticed the invisible cracks.

For eighteen years, I’ve lived in the same city, in the same house. I spent most of my childhood reading stories to escape reality. Dividing my time between fictional worlds and the real one made me appreciate every minute I spent in each one. However, I still want to explore the city and all it has to offer.

I started taking writing more seriously in my first year of high school. Perhaps this stemmed from my passion for reading. I felt empowered to tell my own stories after spending so much time following other characters around. Creating characters and building the worlds they inhabit forced me to become more observant of the world around me. It allowed me to immerse myself into the place where I live to a greater extent.

In grade ten I started a blog. Knowing my attention span, I never expected to stick with it. But I did and I’m learning something new every day. So far blogging taught me to filter the information coming in from my Reader and going out to the world via my posts. I’m excited to see where blogging will take me.

One of my most memorable classes in high school is an introductory to law course. I attribute my teacher and my peers for sparking my interest in social justice.

When I applied for university in my last year of high school, interestingly enough, I stuck with universities in the Toronto and Ottawa area. I felt torn about where to go. In the end I was more attracted to Toronto despite having lived in the GTA all my life. It’s probably an indication that I adore the city and its people.

When I came across Blogging the Just City during course selection, I thought it’d be an opportunity for me to learn a lot about blogging and the city in general.

I now realize Toronto isn’t as perfect as I once thought. Despite its imperfections, I still love the city. I hope it’ll become less divided so I can come to love it even more.